Respiratory System

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Learning Intention: Science Understanding – “Cells are the basic units of living things and have specialised structures and functions. Multi-cellular organisms contain systems of organs that carry out specialised functions that enable them to survive and reproduce.”

Success Criteria:  Students will be able to identify the organs within the respiratory system and describe how it functions. They will understand how the respiratory, circulatory and digestive systems are connected and work together to deliver nutrients and oxygen and remove wastes from every cell within the human body.

So far we have learned about nutrition and the digestive system and how the circulatory system transports materials around the human body. Now we are going to investigate the respiratory system, which provides oxygen to every cell, to allow energy to be released from food. The respiratory system consists of the trachea, bronchus and lungs containing alveloi. There is an important muscle, called the diaphragm, that allows air to be drawn into the lungs and the carbon-dioxide-rich air to be expelled. Access the following sites and then answer the questions below:

  1. Label the diagram of the respiratory system, including the alveoli.
  2. What are the advantages of breathing through your nose?
  3. Why should you blow your nose when you have a cold, rather than sniffing?
  4. What is the function of the epiglottis and happens when you choke?
  5. Where do the respiratory and circulatory systems meet?
  6. Both systems have a large surface area – explain why.
  7. Breathing and respiration have different meanings – explain each.
  8. Both your breathing and heart rate increase during exercise – explain why.
  9. How do high altitudes affect your breathing and circulation? Why might athletes do high altitude training?

Energy in = Energy out

Learning Intention: Students will understand how energy is measured and the energy content of some different foods. They will understand the process of respiration and how much energy is used during some common physical activities.

Success Criteria: You will calculate the amount of energy (in kilojoules) in 100g of some common packaged foods and compare those amounts with the energy use of daily activities. You will be able to describe the process of respiration and write the chemical equation that represents this reaction.

 

The Carbon Cycle – “My Life as a Carbon Atom”

photosynthesis comic

Your task is to write a short story titled “My Life as a Carbon Atom” to demonstrate your understanding of the following processes:

  • Photosynthesis – green plants use sunlight to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrate (glucose) that is used by all other living organisms as the source of food.
  • Respiration – all living organisms (with the exception of a few bacteria) use oxygen to convert carbohydrates into energy, releasing carbon dioxide and water into the atmosphere.
  • Decomposition – Bacteria and fungi break down organic matter (leaves, wood, dead animals etc) into carbon dioxide and water during respiration.
  • Fossil Fuel formation – Oil, coal and gas are formed after millions of years under extreme pressure and high temperatures, from once living organisms such as trees and microscopic algae.
  • Combustion – wood, gas, oil, coal and other carbon-containing compounds can be burnt with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide.

Your story should be at least 500 words long (100 words for each process) and be written from the perspective of a carbon atom. Take your inspiration from the videos (Clickview “Carbon Cycle” and the DVD “Crude”) and use the carbon cycle diagram on page 47 of Science Quest 2.

You can also use “Comic Life”, “Vociethread’, “Photostory”, “Kerpoof” or “Storybird” to illustrate your story.

Due Tuesday 15th March

fossil fuels comic